Aardy R. DeVarque (aardy) wrote,
Aardy R. DeVarque
aardy

  • Mood:

Music quiz answers, part 3

Here are the next two answers to my most recent music quiz.

Since these songs are intended to evoke mental pictures, I highly recommend setting each to play in turn and then sitting back and seeing how well the mental pictures that form in your mind line up with the intended story/pictures.

I'm also curious to hear what reactions y'all have to these songs. It's always interesting to hear how someone else interprets and responds to evocative music.



5. "Death appears at midnight each Halloween. He calls up the dead from their graves to dance for him while he plays his fiddle. His skeletons dance for him until the first break of dawn, when they must return to their graves until the next year."

Answer:
Camille Saint-Saëns, Danse Macabre, 1874. (gotten by nobody)
(link)
Danse Macabre is one of those ubiquitous "spooky" pieces that most people don't know by name but have heard somewhere along the line. It was used in the near-wordless Buffy the Vampire Slayer episode "Hush", it was used in the original Alone in the Dark videogame, and Brits may recognize it as the theme for the Jonathan Creek TV show. And it was used as the background music for the Mickey & Minnie as Hansel & Gretel short, of all things, from the late-1990's Mickey Mouse Works TV show.



6. "The human race begins to evolve from its origins towards becoming superhuman as the sun rises."

Answer:
Richard Strauss, Also Sprach Zarathustra: Einleitung (Thus spoke Zarathustra: Introduction), 1896. (guessed by hobbygeek)
(link)
Based on Friedrich Nietzsche's book of the same title (from whence came the concept of the übermensch or super-man), this piece was made famous and solidly imprinted directly into the collective consciousness by its use in the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey and a thousand thousand subsequent parodies and homages. (And if that wasn't enough, Neil Norman & his Cosmic Orchestra did a quasi-disco cover of it, too. That version is not up on YouTube as far as I can tell--and be very thankful for that.)

At a bit under two minutes long, this also has the distinction of being by far the shortest piece of the ten in this quiz. Technically, it is just the first of the nine sections that make up the approximately 30-minute-long Also Sprach Zarathustra and represents only the "Introduction/Zarathustra's Prologue" section of the book, but there's a clear break between this one and the others, and the other eight aren't nearly as well known as this section is, so I counted it as a song unto itself.



Feudalism: Serf & Turf
Tags: answers, music, quizzes
Subscribe
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    Anonymous comments are disabled in this journal

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

  • 0 comments